Are you struggling to make ends meet… in your electrical system? Stripping and connecting wires can be messy and confusing, but this week Hagerty’s Matt Lewis shows you how to do it quickly and neatly. Using an auto-stripper and a crimper provides a tidy way to join two wires with both barrel and bullet connectors, and Matt explains where to employ each. For areas that require a stronger connection, he demonstrates how to fuse the wires with a soldering iron. Learn to safely connect your switches and ignition so you can get back on the road in no time.

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  1. Sgr 7

    Love these DIY videos. It might be worth mentioning the two different ways to crimp connectors using the crimpers. There are a "pin/cup" and a "cup/cup" crimping area on the crimpers. Some crimpers have non-insulated and insulated labels on the tool. You appear to be using the "pin/cup" slot for insulated connectors and you run the risk of puncturing the insulation and should be used for non-insulated connectors and the "cup/cup" slot for the insulated ones you show in the video. Hope that helps.

  2. iare19

    Yea you don't want any extra connections to be fair.

  3. KanJyro

    never ever use a butt connector. just don't be lazy. do it right so it lasts. always solder connections.

  4. BigCooter.com

    As someone who designs automotive electrical connection systems … I would strongly recommend NOT watching this video.

  5. Casey D.

    I would'nt suggest using the twist splice. My grandpa taught me the way the Western-Union splice and solder wires. Also called the NASA splice.

  6. Никита Ша

    В клеммочку с торца еще немножко литольчику сунуть.. чтоб не отгнил в месте зажима.. а так такие зажими редко пользую.. не надежные они. Скрутка, спайка и термоусадка наше все.

  7. Dusan Radojkovic

    For automotive apllication soldering is not the best way of connecting two wires. Especially under the hood or in other places where heat can be an issue. Crimping is much more safer and bullet proof. You can solder inside of the car, on stereo components and such stuff. I don't say it can't be done but crimping is much more safer and practical.

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